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A family in law

Briefs

Cite as: (2009) 83(06) LIJ, p.14

LIV CEO Mike Brett Young had the rare opportunity to move the admission of not one but two sons at a recent Supreme Court of Victoria ceremony.

The ceremony was one of 11 held on 21 and 22 April that saw 444 candidates admitted as Australian lawyers.

Mr Brett Young was pleased sons James, 26, and Chris, 24, had achieved something “they had wanted to do”.

“As any parent I am proud when my children achieve what they set out to do. But when you have had a career in the law you feel very proud to be able to move their admission,” he said.

“And to move two on the same day was thrilling.”

Mr Brett Young was admitted to practice in 1976, rising to the level of managing partner at Maurice Blackburn before his appointment as CEO of the LIV in 2006.

James completed a bachelor of laws from Monash University in 2007 after previously completing a bachelor of arts from the University of Melbourne.

Chris obtained a bachelor of laws and a bachelor of commerce from the University of Melbourne in 2007.

He said it was gratifying to share the day with his brother after the pair had shared the stress of gaining a law degree.

Chris, a member of the Hall & Wilcox business litigation team, entered the law for its good general grounding and the spectrum of opportunities it offered.

“Also, I’d seen what it is like from watching dad all those years and thought it was quite interesting,” he said.

Meanwhile James, who completed his articled clerkship at Ryan Carlisle Thomas, said a desire to help people in society without a voice drew him to the law.

“I would gain more satisfaction helping someone who was unfairly dismissed get their job back than close a corporate merger,” he said.

The family has a legal history as long as the LIV, which celebrates its sesquicentenary this year. The year the LIV was begun, 1859, Peter Thomas Finn, who is Chris and James’ great-great-grandfather, was admitted as the second “colonial” barrister in the Victorian Supreme Court.

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