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Qualifying to Practise Law

This page summarises the tertiary study and legal training required to practise law in Victoria, as well as details about the admission process. There is also a list of frequently asked questions at the bottom of the page to assist with common queries. Use the quick links below to jump down on the page:

Tertiary Study

Steps to professional legal qualification begin with tertiary study. This can be completed at an undergraduate level (ie Bachelor of Laws (LLB)) or at a postgraduate level (ie LLB Graduate Entry or Master of Laws Juris Doctor (JD)).

There are currently eight Victorian universities offering LLB or JD programs approved by the Victorian Legal Admissions Board:

  • RMIT University
  • The University of Melbourne
  • La Trobe University
  • Deakin University
  • Victoria University
  • Monash University
  • Australian Catholic University
  • Swinburne University of Technology

Careers in law are highly sought after, resulting in stringent entry requirements for tertiary courses in Victoria. Double degrees – where law is combined with arts, commerce or science – are common and can maximise employment opportunities. Prospective law students are encouraged to contact individual universities to find out more information about the degrees offered.

Subject Prerequisites

English is the only prerequisite for entry into a single law degree, but there may be further requirements for double degrees.

You may also be able to apply for admission through a special entry scheme (mature age, course transfer, other entry for applicants failing to meet minimum tertiary requirements). This may require you to sit a special tertiary admission test.

Visit the VTAC website for all the information you need regarding requirements for application and terms of acceptance for all law courses at all tertiary institutions. Your VTAC guide will provide information on combined degrees, entry schemes and requirements, as well as guaranteed and fee places for each university.

Subject Requirements

To be admitted to practise as an Australian lawyer all law students must complete and pass the compulsory "Priestley 11" subjects:

  • Criminal Law and Procedure.
  • Torts.
  • Contracts.
  • Property.
  • Equity (including Trusts).
  • Company Law.
  • Administrative Law.
  • Federal and State Constitutional Law.
  • Civil Procedure.
  • Evidence.
  • Ethics and Professional Responsibility.

What happens after completing tertiary study?

Once study requirements have been met, law graduates wishing to practise law begin their graduate training by undertaking either Practical Legal Training (PLT) or Supervised Legal Training (SLT) as an employee of a firm.

Following completion of either PLT or SLT, law graduates qualify to be admitted to practice providing they have met all of the admission requirements.

Practical Legal Training and Supervised Legal Training

The completion of either Practical Legal Training or Supervised Legal Training is a requirement in order to be admitted to practice.

The Australasian Professional Legal Education Council (APLEC) and the Law Admissions Consultative Committee (LACC) have developed the revised Practical Legal Training Core Competencies for Entry-Level Lawyers (Core Competencies). These are also set out in Schedule 2 of the Legal Profession Uniform Admission Rules 2015 (the Rules).

The Core Competencies state that every applicant is required to satisfy the Victorian Legal Admissions Board that he or she has achieved the prescribed competencies in the "Skills, Compulsory and Optional Practice Areas and Values" (Required Competencies). Students are encouraged to familiarise themselves with the Core Competencies and the Rules.  

Required Competencies:

Skills

Compulsory Practice Areas

Values

Optional Practice Areas (must complete any two of these)

Lawyer’s Skills

Civil Litigation Practice

Ethics & Professional Responsibility

Administrative Law Practice

Problem Solving

Commercial and Corporate Practice

 

Banking and Finance

Work Management and Business Skills

Property Law Practice

 

Criminal Law Practice

Trust and Office Accounting

   

Consumer Law Practice

     

Employment and Industrial Relations Practice

     

Family Law Practice

     

Planning and Environmental Law Practice

     

Wills and Estate Practice

Practical Legal Training

Practical Legal Training (PLT) is the most commonly chosen pathway for admission to practise as a lawyer in Australia. Practical legal training is designed to ensure that graduates are fully prepared to enter the legal profession with the practical skills to complement their technical training.

Successful completion of a practical legal training program ensures the required Core Competencies are fully met.

The following organisations are approved Victorian PLT providers currently offering PLT courses:

  1. The College of Law Victoria
  2. The Leo Cussen Institute
  3. ANU

PLT in a Snapshot:

  • Must be completed with an approved PLT provider.
  • Can be completed in under six months.
  • Consists mainly of course work (either online or on-site at the education facility), with a combination of practical work experience completed in a legal environment.
  • Is paid for by the student or the firm.
  • Fee help is available.

The College of Law Victoria

The College of Law (COL) is Australia’s largest provider of Practical Legal Training and the only one with campuses in New South Wales, Victoria, Queensland and Western Australia.

Their programs are primarily delivered online via a Learning Portal developed specifically for online delivery, ensuring it is practical and relevant to the needs of a graduate lawyer. Graduates have access to a wide range of learning resources and the support of the college’s lecturers. The online program is closely integrated with face-to-face activities giving graduates the best learning opportunities.

The Victorian office and lecturer rooms are located centrally in Melbourne's CBD.

The PLT Program at the COL comprises of three separate components: 

  • Coursework Component;
  • Work Experience Component; and
  • Continuing Professional Education Component.  

Upon completion, graduates are awarded a Graduate Diploma in Legal Practice, qualifying them for admission to practice in Victoria. For more information please contact the COL Enrolments Office on 1300 865 111 or enrolments@collaw.edu.au or visit The College of Law Victoria website.

Leo Cussen Institute

Leo Cussen Institute offers a PLT course that satisfies the practical legal training requirements for admission to the legal profession in Victoria and enables admission in other Australian states under mutual recognition rules.

The PTC is delivered in both onsite (face to face) and online programs. The online program includes substantial face-to-face contact. It is a 24-week course including 3 weeks professional placement. There are two intakes into each program each year (January and July).

On completion graduates receive a Graduate Diploma in Legal Practice and a Certificate of Satisfactory Completion qualifying them for admission to the legal profession in Victoria.

For further information contact Leo Cussen on ptcadmin@leocussen.vic.edu.au or visit the Leo Cussen Institute website.

ANU

ANU is Australia’s leading University provider of Practical Legal Training (PLT). The ANU Graduate Diploma of Legal Practice (GDLP) provides not only the qualification you need to be admitted as a lawyer in Australia, the GDLP provides the skills you need to take the next step in your career in any professional environment. Designed to provide you with the practical skills and professional understanding you will need as a lawyer, the ANU GDLP builds on the knowledge you have gained in your Bachelor of Law degree or Juris Doctor, or equivalent.

The ANU GDLP program uses online learning to enable you to balance your PLT with employment, or other personal commitments and to study at ANU regardless of your location - our GDLP students are based all over Australia, and the world. Our initial 4 day face-to-face course (the only compulsory face-to-face component of the GDLP) is delivered all over Australia at various times throughout the year, including multiple offerings in Victoria.

Find out more about your ANU GDLP here: https://legalworkshop.law.anu.edu.au/gdlp

Contact: T: +61 2 6125 3483. E: lwsa.law@anu.edu.au

Once you have completed your GDLP you can apply to be admitted as a legal practitioner anywhere in Australia. You also have the option to continue your studies and graduate with a Master of Legal Practice (MLP) degree. Find out more here: https://legalworkshop.law.anu.edu.au/mlp

Supervised Legal Training

Supervised Legal Training (SLT) is a 12-month traineeship with a legal firm or office, working under the supervision of a practitioner.

Graduates completing their traineeship with a firm are referred to as law graduates or legal trainees.

SLT snapshot:

  • 12 months on-the-job training.
  • Predominantly practical training as an employee of a firm.
  • Employment is paid.
  • Mandatory requirement to complete ten core competencies.
  • Some compulsory external training is required.

Throughout the traineeship year, a law graduate must complete training in the Core Competencies for Entry-Level Lawyers (Core Competencies), which are also set out in Schedule 2 of the Legal Profession Uniform Admission Rules 2015 (Rules).

Following the completion of SLT individuals and firms need to comply with the admission requirements under the Rules including providing particular information to the Victorian Legal Admissions Board.

Required Training

During the 12-month traineeship, law graduates must acquire appropriate understanding and competence in each of the Required Competences including the compulsory "skills", "practice areas" and "values". Trainees are also expected to complete training in two optional practice areas chosen in consultation with their employer.

The majority of the training required can be completed either in-house (on the job), externally with an accredited practical legal training (PLT) provider, or through a combination of both.

Where a trainee has completed training through an external training provider, a document certifying the trainee’s satisfactory completion of the training module should be retained.

For the compulsory external practical training or competency practice area training you can contact:

Ethics and Professional Responsibility, Lawyer’s Skills and the Risk Management element of Work Management and Business Skills must be completed through a PLT provider, or another provider approved by the Victorian Legal Admissions Board (see Schedule 3, Clause 6(1)(c) of the Rules).

For more information on seeking approval to teach these areas within a law firm or organisation please visit the Victorian Legal Admissions Board website. 

Examples of SLT in Practice

Scenario 1:

Jessica is working at a medium sized boutique firm; she is able to complete all the skills, practice areas and values through file work under the supervision of different partners of the firm. As required under the rules, Jessica is enrolling to complete Ethics and Professional Responsibility through a PLT provider and is seeking approval from the Victorian Legal Admissions Board to cover Lawyers Skills and Risk Management internally with the firm.

Scenario 2:

Michael is completing his traineeship with a specialist Criminal Law firm. Michael is enrolling to complete Ethics and Professional Responsibility through a PLT provider and is seeking approval from the Victorian Legal Admissions Board to cover Lawyers Skills and Risk Management internally. Michael will also need to complete his training for the compulsory practice area(s) through a PLT provider as he cannot complete them internally.

Requirements Upon Commencing a Traineeship

Within one month of executing a training plan law graduates must submit to the Victorian Legal Admissions Board for approval (Schedule 3, Clause 10):

  • a copy of an executed training plan
  • a statutory declaration made by the person executing the training plan on behalf of the employer, verifying the training plan
  • any other relevant information that the Board may require.

Law graduates from regional Victoria are encouraged to call the Victorian Legal Admissions Board and request approval to submit their documents by post.

Law graduates must also arrange for their university to send directly to the Victorian Legal Admissions Board an original academic transcript, setting out the results obtained, as evidence they have satisfied the academic qualifications referred to at rule 5(1) of the Rules.

The Training Plan

The Training Plan acts as a 12-month timetable outlining the competency standards the law graduate will cover during their traineeship year and must be approved by the Victorian Legal Admissions Board.

Where the Training Plan is not approved by the Victorian Legal Admissions Board it may give the law graduate leave to withdraw and to resubmit the training plan within a specified period so that any necessary amendments can be incorporated.

Once this new Training Plan is approved any period of training that has been undertaken prior to the Victorian Legal Admission Board’s approval will be taken to be training and therefore be included towards the required 12 months of training.

A workbook must be maintained throughout the traineeship, which records the law graduate’s completion of each task and demonstrates competence in each element of the skills, values and practice areas.

For up-to-date information for law graduates and firms, please visit the Supervised Legal Training section of the Victorian Legal Admissions Board website or contact the Victorian Legal Admissions Board on 03 9604 2451 or vlab@justice.vic.gov.au. The Victorian Legal Admissions Board has also produced a Guide for Supervised Legal Training.

The Admission Process

The Legal Profession Uniform Admission Rules 2015 (Rules) came into effect on 1 July 2015 and replaces the Legal Profession (Admission) Rules 2008. Law graduates are encouraged to read the Rules carefully to familiarise themselves with the admission requirements and the documents required to be submitted to the Victorian Legal Admissions Board.

Upon completion of a Bachelor of Laws and either Supervised Legal Training or Practical Legal Training, all law graduates seeking admission to legal practice must lodge a completed Application for Compliance Certificate form (see rule 15(1) of the Rules). Additionally, the following documentation must be provided to the Board:

  • An academic transcript from the law graduate’s university as evidence of qualifications, and a certificate of completion of a PLT course (if one has been completed) – to be sent directly to the Board by the educational institution (see rule 15 of the Rules).
  • An original Student Conduct Report from the law graduate’s university and PLT provider – to be sent directly to the Board by the educational institution (see rule 19 of the Rules).
  • A National Police Certificate (see rule 18 of the Rules).
  • Two character statements (see rule 16 of the Rules).
  • A disclosure statement statutory declaration if required (see rule 17 of the Rules).
  • A capacity disclosure statutory declaration if required (see rule 17 of the Rules).

Photo identification must also be shown.

All law graduates are strongly encouraged to read the Guide for Applicants – Admission as a Lawyer in Victoria before completing the Application for Compliance Certificate.

Admission Dates

These can be found on the Victorian Legal Admissions Board website.

Filing of Documents

All law graduates must lodge an original typed Application for Compliance Certificate, which must be filed in person. Correct photo ID must be shown. If the ID does not show a date of birth or an address then a secondary form of ID such as a utility bill must be shown.

For law graduates who reside 100kms from the Melbourne CBD, applications will be accept by post with a certified copy of their ID.

The Victorian Legal Admissions Board is located on the Ground Floor at 451 Little Bourke Street, Melbourne.

Please visit the Victorian Legal Admissions Board website for further information on admission requirements.

Frequently Asked Questions

  • What is the difference between Practical Legal Training (PLT) and Supervised Legal Training (SLT)?

    Since July 2008, there have been two paths to admission for law graduates in Victoria – Practical Legal Training (PLT) or Supervised Legal Training (Traineeships).

    PLT comprises a combination of formal coursework and a period of work experience and is available from providers such as The College of LawLeo Cussens Centre for Law, and Australia National University (ANU) College of Law.

    A Traineeship involves 12 months of supervised workplace training in a law firm and some additional compulsory training with an external provider.

  • What do most Victorian law graduates do for training?

    Most law graduates do a PLT program. This is the case across Australia and in some states there is no traineeship alternative.

  • What is involved in PLT?

    A PLT program consists of a combination of coursework and work experience.

    PLT coursework and Traineeships must both cover the National Competency Standards prescribed by the Australasian Professional Legal Education Council (APLEC), the Law Admissions Consultative Committee (LACC) and all the admitting authorities in Australia.

  • What subjects do I have to do in PLT?

    Skills

    • Lawyer’s Skills
    • Problem Solving
    • Work Management and Business Skills
    • Trust and Office Accounting

    Compulsory Practice Areas

    • Civil Litigation Practice
    • Commercial and Corporate Practice
    • Property Law Practice
    • Two electives
  • Is there any choice of subjects with PLT?

    There are compulsory subjects which you must take, such as Civil Litigation Practice and Professional Responsibility/Ethics, but you also undertake two electives of your choice from:

    • Administrative Law Practice
    • Banking and Finance
    • Criminal Law Practice
    • Consumer Law Practice
    • Employment and Industrial Relations Practice
    • Family Law Practice
    • Planning and Environmental Law Practice
    • Wills and Estates Practice.
  • Can I study PLT online?

    Yes. Each of the PLT providers in Victoria offer online courses. However there is often some compulsory face to face teaching blocks. Check with each of the providers as to their courses’ specific requirements and structure.

  • How long will PLT take?

    You can study full-time in which case the PLT coursework component will take 15 weeks; part-time will take you 30 weeks. You also need to do your work experience which can be concurrent with the part-time option.

    Taking into account the work experience requirement, you can be ready for Admission in only 30 weeks compared to the 52 weeks required by SLT.

    You’ll need to allow 30 to 35 hours of study a week for the full-time program and about 15 to 17 hours a week for the part-time program.

  • When can I start PLT?

    An applicant can commence PLT only after he/she has completed an academic qualification accredited, or deemed to be accredited, under rule 7 of the Uniform Admission Rules, unless the applicant has no more than two academic subjects to complete:

    • neither of which is one of the academic areas of knowledge set out in Schedule 1, and
    • for which the applicant must be enrolled while undertaking the PLT course,

    and the applicant has received the prior permission of the Board to commence the PLT course.

    The College of Law runs a number of PLT programs through the year. Generally you will be able to start in December, January, March, April, May, July or October.   

    The Leo Cussen Centre for Law runs PLT programs beginning in January and July.

    Click here for information on starting dates for Australian National University (ANU).

  • How much does PLT cost?

    Check The College of Law websiteLeo Cussen Centre for Law website, and Australian National University (ANU) website for the current fees.

    You can pay by using FEE-HELP which is a loan available via the Higher Education Loan Program or you or a law firm can pay upfront.

  • How much work experience do I need?

    With The College of Law you need to undertake 75 days of work experience, some of which can have been done during your law degree.  An alternative option is to do the Clinical Experience Module which involves 25 days of work experience and additional coursework that accounts for 50 days of work experience.

    With Leo Cussen Centre for Law you need to undertake a three-week professional placement. In the Onsite PTC, the professional placement takes place after you have completed the formal PTC work and is arranged by the institute. In the Online PTC, you must arrange the placement and it must be approved by the Director PTC.

    For information about work experience during the Australian National University (ANU) PLT course, see the  ANU website.

    The rules about Work Experience differ from state to state.

  • How do I obtain work experience?

    You can find positions in a variety of ways, for example by checking your university careers centre, The College of Law Career Centreor the LIV Graduate Employment Registry or by asking around at the careers fairs.

  • How do I enrol in PLT?

    You can apply to enrol online at The College of LawLeo Cussen Institute, or Australian National University (ANU), or send in a paper application.

    You will need your FEE-HELP application or payment details to finalise your application.

    We will also need a certified copy of your Academic Transcript when it is available and before you complete your PLT coursework.

  • Are there quotas or waiting lists?

    PLT programs do not have quotas or waiting lists but does ask you to enrol at least two weeks prior to the start date of your program of choice. However, first preference may be given to applicants who meet the prerequisites at the time of application.

  • Can I commence PLT while completing Academic Qualifications?

    According to the revised Core Competencies, an applicant may now commence PLT whilst still completing their academic qualifications, providing they have no more than two subjects to complete. However, the outstanding two subjects cannot be Priestly 11 subjects, they must be two elective subjects. Prior permission must be granted by the Victorian Legal Admissions Board to allow a student to commence the PLT whilst still completing their academic qualification.

    For further information, visit the Victorian Legal Admissions Board website.

  • Will the Legal Profession Uniform Admission Rules 2015 affect me?

    If you are intending to seek admission to practice in the future, then yes the Rules will affect you.

  • What are my obligations as an employer?

    Schedule 3, Clause 4 states that as an employer of a trainee, you must:

    • keep a register of trainees and supervisors within your legal practice or business
    • implement a training plan for the trainee in compliance with matters set out under Schedule 3, Clause 9
    • execute a training plan on behalf of the employer and trainee, and for each supervisor included in the plan
    • provide the trainee with appropriate opportunities to carry out their obligations under the Rules
    • ensure that the trainee is appropriately supervised
    • meet the costs of the trainee’s supervision and training.
  • Who can be a supervisor?

    Schedule 2, Clause 2 specifies that a person may supervise a trainee if the person is an Australian lawyer:

    • engaged in legal practice or as a government, corporate, commercial or community legal officer; and
    • is working principally in Victoria; and
    • who has worked as either or both a practising solicitor or practising barrister for a minimum total of five years (of which at least the three years before the person commences to supervise a trainee were spent in either or both of practice as a solicitor, or working in the manner of a solicitor). 
  • What is the applications deadline for traineeship positions?

    The LIV Traineeship Guidelines stipulate the key recruitment dates for firms who are signatories to the Guidelines.  

    For firms that are not signatories to the Guidelines the deadline for submitting an application varies from firm to firm. Check the date by:

    • searching the firm’s website
    • calling the firm
    • referring to the Careers Guides published by the law students’ societies at each of the Victorian law schools.

    These publications generally contain contact details, important dates, areas of practice and other information about traineeships and seasonal clerkship opportunities specific to each law firm.

  • Is there an alternative to SLT?

    You can also gain admission to practice in Victoria by completing a Practical Legal Training course. 

  • How many trainees can a supervisor engage?

    Under Schedule 2, Clause 5(3), a person must not be the supervisor of more than one trainee at the same time without prior approval from the Victorian Legal Admissions Board. The Board have produced guidelines for supervisors wishing to supervise more than one trainee. View the guidelines.

  • What is the duration of the traineeship?

    Traineeships are for 12 months but it is also possible for traineeships to be completed part-time over a two-year period. If you wish to undertake part-time supervised legal training over a period of 24 months you should contact the Board on 03 9604 2451. A formal application must be made to the Board prior to commencement of your traineeship.

  • What do I need to do when I start my SLT (traineeship)?

    Within one month of executing a training plan you must, per Schedule 3, Clause 10, submit to the Victorian Legal Admissions Board for approval:

    • a copy of the executed training plan;
    • a statutory declaration made by the person executing the training plan on behalf of the employer, verifying the training plan; and
    • any other relevant information that the Board may require.

    If you are an applicant from regional Victoria you are encouraged to call the board and request approval to submit your documents by post.

    You must also arrange for your university to send directly to the Board an original academic transcript, setting out the results obtained, as evidence you have satisfied the academic qualifications referred to at Rule 5(1).

    For further information visit the Law Admissions website. 

  • When can I start and finish my traineeship?

    The traineeship must be 12 months duration. Provided the trainee has completed all the requirements of the LLB there are no restrictions or guidelines for when a traineeship must commence. Therefore the commencement date may be negotiated between the trainee and the firm.

  • I have completed my law degree but have not graduated, can I commence my SLT or PLT?

    Yes. Provided you have satisfies the requirements of the LLB you may commence your traineeship. You must however have formally graduated before you are admitted to practice or apply to the Board for admission prior to graduation.

  • How do I know what work I need to do to comply with the competency standards?

    Schedule 2 of the rules lists the elements for each competency standard as well as the performance criteria that should be met in order to satisfactorily comply with the rules.

  • Do employers need to keep formal records of the training provided?

    It would be prudent for employers to keep a record of any formal training conducted externally or specifically referred to in the training plan (similar to the records which might be kept in order to comply with the Continuing Professional Development Rules). Trainees are also encouraged to keep a diary of the work they are completing which complies with the performance criteria listed in schedule two.

  • During the Supervised Legal Training who should pay for the cost of any external training?

    Under rule 4 (2) unless the Board determines otherwise, a trainee’s employer must meet the cost of any training relevant to:

    1. a trainee’s supervision, and
    2. a trainee meeting the requirements of rule 6 (1).
  • Who can conduct the required training?

    Trainees may complete the majority of their training either in-house with their workplace or externally with an accredited Practical Legal Training provider or through a mixture of both.

    Ethics and Professional Responsibility, Lawyer’s Skills and the Risk Management element of Work Management and Business Skills must be completed through a PLT provider, or another provider approved by the Victorian Legal Admissions Board (see Schedule 3, Clause 6(1)(c).

    All other areas of competency may potentially be conducted in-house by the employer.

  • I have decided to study a different elective; do I need to re-lodge my training plan with the Board of Examiners?

    Any minor alterations to your training plan should be set out in Schedule 6 (Employers – Completion of Supervised Legal Training) at the conclusion of your traineeship. Any major alterations should be discussed with the Board on 03 9604 2451.

  • Can we get approval to teach a different optional area to the ones listed in the Rules?

    Trainees must complete one optional practice area from the identified practice areas and an employer who wishes to provide training in an alternative practice area must apply by statutory declaration for the Board’s approval (Schedule 12).

    The statutory declaration should be lodged with the Board before the training plan. Once an employer has been approved to provide training in an alternative optional practice area that approval will be ongoing, provided that the employer exhibits a copy of the approved application to the training plan of any future supervised legal trainees.

    In circumstances where the Board has granted approval to provide a course of instruction in an Alternative Optional Practice Area each new trainee must file a statutory declaration seeking dispensation in accordance with the Rules to include an alternative optional practice area (Schedule 13).

  • How many annual leave days is a trainee entitled to?

    A trainee is allowed a leave of absence:

    • on all days that are public holidays in Victoria
    • up to 10 days sick leave
    • a further period not exceeding 20 days.

    If a trainee takes a leave of absence for any period in addition to these periods, the trainee must complete an equivalent additional period of Supervised Legal Training.

  • Can a trainee engage in additional paid or unpaid work during the Supervised Legal Training?

    A trainee must not engage in any paid work while undertaking training without first obtaining the consent of the person who executed the trainee’s training plan on behalf of the employer, except:

    1. in the business conducted by that employer, or
    2. in accordance with the relevant training plan.
  • Who pays for admission fees?

    It is the responsibility of the applicant to pay the admission fees. An employer may agree to pay your admission fee but it is not a requirement of the Admission Rules.

  • I have a law degree from interstate. How do I commence a traineeship in Victoria?

    In exactly the same manner as a Victorian law graduate.

  • Will my law degree still be valid if I don’t do my traineeship immediately after my degree?

    Under Rule 5 if an applicant has attained their academic qualifications prerequisite more than five years before applying for a compliance certificate, the Board, after assessing the applicant’s academic qualifications and any other relevant experience, may require the applicant to:

    • undertake any further academic subjects
    • pass any further examinations
    • apply for a compliance certificate within any period
    • determined by the Board.
  • Can a law graduate’s SLT ever be terminated?

    Yes, if at any time during a period of Supervised Legal Training the Victorian Legal Admissions Board forms the view that (schedule 3 rule 12 of the Rules):

    • a law graduate is not receiving appropriate supervision
    • a training plan is not being complied with
    • a law graduate is not deriving substantial benefit from the training, or
    • for any other reason it is appropriate to do so.

    The Victorian Legal Admissions Board may either:

    • terminate the training, or
    • approve another appropriate employer and one or more eligible supervisors to provide the balance of the training, under a revised training plan.