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Every Issue

Cite as: (2003) 77(4) LIJ, p.76

Planning schemes, corporations law judgments, federal government contacts, legal advice for the arts community and weird and wonderful words are all covered in this month’s reviews.

Planning schemes, corporations law judgments, federal government contacts, legal advice for the arts community and weird and wonderful words are all covered in this month’s reviews.

Planning Schemes Online

http://www.doi.vic.gov.au/planningschemes

Victorian Planning Schemes Online provides access to the approved planning schemes for 78 local government and three special planning areas. You will need Adobe Acrobat Reader to view much of the information. From the initial page click on Planning Schemes Online, then (after reading the disclaimer) the Quick Start button. Select a rural or metropolitan municipality from the drop down menus. Once in the planning scheme the page is divided in two: the left-hand side takes you to maps showing zones and overlays, the right-hand side to the ordinance files (planning scheme text). Access a list of amendments from the right-hand side of the screen. If you click on the link (or map) on the left-hand side, two separate pages will open – one the index map, the other the legend. This site is complex and somewhat confusing, but we should be grateful that it exists.


Victorian Planning Provisions

http://www.doi.vic.gov.au/planningschemes

If you are not interested in a particular planning scheme but instead require general information or standard planning provisions, you should refer to the Victorian Planning Provisions (VPP). A link to the VPP is provided in the left-hand side menu of the Planning Schemes Online homepage. From the VPP homepage, launch the current VPP (read the disclaimer), then click on Start/Accept. Use the drop down menus to find out about zone and overlay requirements etc. Provisions are presented as Acrobat Portable Document Format (PDF) files so you will need Adobe Acrobat Reader to view them. A list of amendments is provided. You may also wish to take a look at the Planning Practice Note series, which provides practical advice about specific aspects of the Victorian planning system.


Corporate Law Judgments

http://cclsr.law.unimelb.edu.au/judgments/index.html

This database is a great alternative to AustLII for locating corporations law decisions. It has a flexible search screen where you can search on date, judge, court, case name, keywords or phrase – read the search tips for more effective results. The results are displayed with an abstract to help you decide their relevance to your query. The judgments include catchwords as well as a list of the cases cited. While a date could not be found for the most recent decision, searching on cases added in on the day of writing this review returned five hits, all decided in late 2002. Maintained by the Centre for Corporate Law and Securities Regulation at the University of Melbourne, this site was established in 1999 with the support of the Federal Court and state Supreme Courts.

Note: There are only selected decisions before 1999.


Commonwealth Government Online Directory

http://www.gold.gov.au

As the title suggests, this site supplies the direct contact details for all levels of the federal government. Enter the names of individuals into the search field to find their contact phone number, department and full title of their position. An advanced search provides more options. Browsing by department you can access basic details including web addresses, a list of other portfolio bodies with links to their websites, and a very useful list of the legislation administered by that department. Conversely, to find which department administers a specific Act, enter the name of the Act in the search field and choose “Function” from the drop down menu. The Courts and Judges link provides contact details for all Federal Courts, judges and registries. A good starting point for navigating the maze of federal government information.


The Arts Law Centre of Australia

http://www.artslaw.com.au

Funded by the Australia Council, the Arts Law Centre is a non-profit organisation which offers legal advice to the arts community. This site provides online legal advice in the form of free information sheets and articles. The information sheets cover topics such as trade marks, introduction to contracts, copyright, small claims and superannuation. There are articles on each of the subjects listed on the left-hand side of the home page: moral rights, film, music, performing arts, writing and tax issues – all the articles are dated. There are also numerous sample contracts for sale at a reasonable price. Click on the publications order form to view a full list of precedents.


World Wide Words: International English from a British point of view

http://www.worldwidewords.org

Are you a logophile (lover of words)? Do you know what floccinaucinihilipilification means? Would you like to? World Wide Words features unusual words, including many that resist pronunciation. The turn of phrase section lists new words destined for inclusion in English dictionaries. The articles cover an eclectic range of topics, from “Citing Online Sources: Advice on online citations formats” to “Beam me up, Scotty!: The linguistic legacy of Star Trek”. The target audience would appear not to be octogenarians. Visit the links page to locate sites on good and bad English, etymology, rhetoric, phonetics and linguistics, as well as less common resources such as Maledicta, a discussion of multilingual insults (and obscenities) and Mondegreen, on the creative mishearing of lyrics.


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