this product is unavailable for purchase using a firm account, please log in with a personal account to make this purchase.

Practice Notes

Every Issue

Cite as: (2008) 82(7) LIJ, p. 69

Federal Court

Cite as: (2008) 82(7) LIJ, p. 69

Case management and the individual docket system
Notice to practitioners and litigants issued by the Chief Justice.

1. Introduction

1.1 It is 10 years since the docket system was introduced into the Federal Court.

1.2 The essential element of the individual docket system is that a case is allocated to a docket of a particular judge at the time of filing with the intention that it will remain with that judge for case management and disposition.

1.3 The purpose of this notice is to restate the purposes and principles underpinning the individual docket system.

2. Purposes

2.1 The overarching purposes of individual case management within the docket system is the just resolution of disputes as quickly, inexpensively and efficiently as possible.

2.2 These purposes inform what the Court does in its management of proceedings.

2.3 The Court requires that the parties and their representatives give effect to these purposes in their conduct of proceedings.

3. Principles

3.1 In giving effect to the overarching purposes, the Court, the profession and the parties will necessarily have regard to what the interests of justice, either generally or in the particular case, require.

3.2 To that end, the Court may be expected to have regard to the desirability of:

(a) identifying and narrowing the issues in dispute as early as possible;

(b) ascertaining the degree of difficulty or complexity of the issues really in dispute;

(c) setting a trial date early;

(d) minimising unnecessary interlocutory steps by permitting only interlocutory steps that are directed to identifying, narrowing or resolving the issues really in dispute between the parties;

(e) exploring options for assisted dispute resolution as early as practicable.

3.3 The parties and their representatives have an obligation to cooperate with and assist the Court in fulfilling the overarching purposes and, in particular, in identifying the real issues in dispute as early as possible and dealing with those issues in the most efficient way possible.

Chief Justice MEJ Black
5 May 2008

Federal Court

Cite as: (2008) 82(6) LIJ, p. 73

Guidelines for expert witnesses in proceedings in the Federal Court of Australia
Practice Direction

This replaces the practice direction “Guidelines for Expert Witnesses in Proceedings in the Federal Court of Australia” issued on 6 June 2007.

Practitioners should give a copy of the following guidelines to any witness they propose to retain for the purpose of preparing a report or giving evidence in a proceeding as to an opinion held by the witness that is wholly or substantially based on the specialised knowledge of the witness (see Part 3.3 – Opinion, Evidence Act 1995 (Cth)).

Chief Justice MEJ Black
5 May 2008

Explanatory Memorandum
The guidelines are not intended to address all aspects of an expert witness’s duties, but are intended to facilitate the admission of opinion evidence,1 and to assist experts to understand in general terms what the Court expects of them. Additionally, it is hoped that the guidelines will assist individual expert witnesses to avoid the criticism that is sometimes made (whether rightly or wrongly) that expert witnesses lack objectivity, or have coloured their evidence in favour of the party calling them.

Ways by which an expert witness giving opinion evidence may avoid criticism of partiality include ensuring that the report, or other statement of evidence:

(a) is clearly expressed and not argumentative in tone;

(b) is centrally concerned to express an opinion, on a clearly defined question or questions, based on the expert’s specialised knowledge;

(c) identifies with precision the factual premises on which the opinion is based;

(d) explains the process of reasoning by which the expert reached the opinion expressed in the report;

(e) is confined to the area or areas of the expert’s specialised knowledge; and

(f) identifies any pre-existing relationship (such as that of treating medical practitioner or a firm’s accountant) between the author of the report, or his or her firm,
company etc, and a party to the litigation.

An expert is not disqualified from giving evidence by reason only of a pre-existing relationship with the party that proffers the expert as a witness, but the nature of the pre-existing relationship should be disclosed.

The expert should make it clear whether, and to what extent, the opinion is based on the personal knowledge of the expert (the factual basis for which might be required to be established by admissible evidence of the expert or another witness) derived from the ongoing relationship rather than on factual premises or assumptions provided to the expert by way of instructions.

All experts need to be aware that if they participate to a significant degree in the process of formulating and preparing the case of a party, they may find it difficult to maintain objectivity.

An expert witness does not compromise objectivity by defending, forcefully if necessary, an opinion based on the expert’s specialised knowledge which is genuinely held. Objectivity may be compromised if the expert is, for example, unwilling to give consideration to alternative factual premises or is unwilling, where appropriate, to acknowledge recognised differences of opinion or approach between experts in the relevant discipline.

Some expert evidence is necessarily evaluative in character and, to an extent, argumentative. Some evidence by economists about the definition of the relevant market in competition law cases and evidence by anthropologists about the identification of a traditional society for the purposes of native title applications may be of such a character. The Court has a discretion to treat essentially argumentative evidence as submission: see O.10 para 1(2)(j).

The guidelines are, as their title indicates, no more than guidelines. Attempts to apply them literally in every case may prove unhelpful. In some areas of specialised knowledge and in some circumstances (e.g. some aspects of economic evidence in competition law cases), their literal interpretation may prove unworkable.

The Court expects legal practitioners and experts to work together to ensure that the guidelines are implemented in a practically sensible way which ensures that they achieve their intended purpose.

Nothing in the guidelines is intended to require the retention of more than one expert on the same subject matter – one to assist and one to give evidence. In most cases this would be wasteful so it is not required by the guidelines. Expert assistance may be required in the early identification of the real issues in dispute.

Guidelines

1. General duty to the Court2

1.1 An expert witness has an overriding duty to assist the Court on matters relevant to the expert’s area of expertise.

1.2 An expert witness is not an advocate for a party, even when giving testimony that is necessarily evaluative rather than inferential.3

1.3 An expert witness’s paramount duty is to the Court and not to the person retaining the expert.

2. The form of the expert evidence4

2.1 An expert’s written report must give details of the expert’s qualifications and of the literature or other material used in making the report.

2.2 All assumptions of fact made by the expert should be clearly and fully stated.

2.3 The report should identify and state the qualifications of each person who carried out any tests or experiments on which the expert relied in compiling the report.

2.4 Where several opinions are provided in the report, the expert should summarise them.

2.5 The expert should give the reasons for each opinion.

2.6 At the end of the report the expert should declare that “[the expert] has made all the inquiries that [the expert] believes are desirable and appropriate and that no matters of significance that [the expert] regards as relevant have, to [the expert’s] knowledge, been withheld from the Court”.

2.7 There should be included in or attached to the report:

(i) a statement of the questions or issues that the expert was asked to address;

(ii) the factual premises on which the report proceeds; and

(iii) the documents and other materials that the expert has been instructed to consider.

2.8 If, after exchange of reports or at any other stage, an expert witness changes a material opinion, having read another expert’s report or for any other reason, the change should be communicated in a timely manner (through legal representatives) to each party to whom the expert witness’s report has been provided and, when appropriate, to the Court.5

2.9 If an expert’s opinion is not fully researched because the expert considers that insufficient data is available, or for any other reason, this must be stated with an indication that the opinion is no more than a provisional one. Where an expert witness who has prepared a report believes that it may be incomplete or inaccurate without some qualification, that qualification must be stated in the report.6

2.10 The expert should make it clear when a particular question or issue falls outside the relevant field of expertise.

2.11 Where an expert’s report refers to photographs, plans, calculations, analyses, measurements, survey reports or other extrinsic matter, these must be provided to the opposite party at the same time as the exchange of reports.7

3. Experts’ conference

3.1 If experts retained by the parties meet at the direction of the Court, it would be improper for an expert to be given, or to accept, instructions not to reach agreement. If, at a meeting directed by the Court, the experts cannot reach agreement about matters of expert opinion, they should specify their reasons for being unable to do so.

Notes

1. As to the distinction between expert opinion evidence and expert assistance see Evans Deakin Pty Ltd v Sebel Furniture Ltd [2003] FCA 171, per Allsop J at [676].

2. See r35.3 Civil Procedure Rules (UK); see also Lord Woolf, “Medics, lawyers and the courts” [1997] 16 CJQ 302 at 313.

3. See Sampi v State of Western Australia [2005] FCA 777 at [792]-[793], and ACCC v Liquorland and Woolworths [2006] FCA 826 at [836]-[842].

4. See r35.10 Civil Procedure Rules (UK) and Practice Direction 35 “Experts and Assessors (UK)”; HG v the Queen (1999) 197 CLR 414 per Gleeson CJ at [39]-[43]; Ocean Marine Mutual Insurance Association (Europe) OV v Jetopay Pty Ltd [2000] FCA 1463 (FC) at [17]-[23].

5. The “Ikarian Reefer” [1993] 20 FSR 563 at 565.

6. Note 5 above.

7. The “Ikarian Reefer”, note 5 above at 565-566. See also Ormrod, “Scientific evidence in court” [1968] 240.

Federal Court/Federal Magistrates Court

Cite as: (2008) 82(7) LIJ, p. 70

Increase in filing and other fees
The federal Attorney-General’s Department has recently advised that, pursuant to reg 8 of the Federal Court of Australia Regulations 2004 and reg 14 of the Federal Magistrates Court Regulations 2000, from 1 July 2008 the fees prescribed for the Federal Court and the Federal Magistrates Court will be the amounts listed in the following tables (page 67-68). The Attorney-General’s Department gazetted the new fees on 28 May 2008.

Philip Kellow
Deputy Registrar
30 May 2008

Federal Court Fees

Cite as: (2008) 82(7) LIJ, p. 71

Click the following link to view the Federal Court Fees http://www.liv.asn.au/journal/pdf/FCourtFees.pdf

Federal Magistrates Court Fees

Cite as: (2008) 82(7) LIJ, p. 72

Click the following link to view the Federal Magistrates Courts Fees http://www.liv.asn.au/journal/pdf/FMCourtFees.pdf

County Court

Cite as: (2008) 82(7) LIJ, p. 70

Amended County Court Rules

As from 1 June 2008, a number of amendments to the County Court Rules of Procedure in Civil Proceedings 1999 will come into operation.

The amendments provide for various new and expanded Lists and Divisions.

The changes may be briefly summarised as follows:

1. There will be two Lists in the Court’s civil jurisdiction:

  • Commercial List (judge in charge: Judge Anderson)
  • Damages & Compensation List (judge in charge: Judge Davis).

2. The Commercial List is to contain the following Divisions:

  • General Commercial Division (judge in charge: Judge Anderson)
  • Expedited Commercial Cases Division (judge in charge: Judge Anderson)
  • Banking and Finance Division (this is a new Division) (judge in charge: Judge Kennedy)
  • Family Property Division (this is a new Division) (judge in charge: Judge Misso)
  • Building Cases Division (judge in charge: Judge Shelton).

3. The General Commercial Division is to consist of any proceeding which arises out of a commercial transaction or involves personal or real property but may include a proceeding which does not fit within the definition of any other List or Division.

4. The Expedited Commercial Cases Division is to consist of any proceeding nominated by a plaintiff at the time of the issue of the proceeding to be included in that Division,
or cases transferred to the Division on the application of any party where it is appropriate that the proceeding receive an expedited hearing or be subject to more intensive case management.

5. The Banking and Finance Division is to consist of any proceeding arising out of or concerning or related to any transaction involving the provision of credit, including a proceeding concerning a mortgage or guarantee or for the recovery of possession of land. Judge Kennedy will be the judge in charge of this new Division.

6. The Family Property Division of the Commercial List is to consist of proceedings in which orders are sought pursuant to Part IX of the Property Law Act 1958 or Part IV of the Administration and Probate Act 1958. This new Division brings together for the purpose of case management disputes concerning domestic partners’ property, wills and probate, and family maintenance applications which were formerly allocated to either the Miscellaneous Division of the Commercial List or the Applications Division of the Damages List. Cases in this Division will be managed in order to minimise cost and maximise the chance of early resolution.

7. The Damages & Compensation List is to contain the following Divisions:

  • Applications Division (judge in charge: Judge Holt)
  • Defamation Division (judge in charge: Judge Williams)
  • General Division (judge in charge: Judge Davis)
  • Medical Division (judge in charge: Judge Wodak)
  • Serious Injury Application Division (judge in charge: Judge Davis)
  • WorkCover Division (judge in charge: Judge Coish).

8. The WorkCover Division will consist of all statutory benefits cases and the Serious Injury Application Division will consist of all applications under ss134AB, 135A/AC of the Accident Compensation Act 1985, and applications under s93 of the Transport Accident Act 1986.

9. Cases involving rejection of disability claims or vehicle property damage will be allocated to the General Division of the Damages & Compensation List (these cases were formerly allocated to the Miscellaneous Division of the Business List).

County Court Registry
20 May 2008

County Court

Cite as: (2008) 82(7) LIJ, p. 72

Subpoenas in relation to confidential communications (s32C Evidence Act) in relation to cases involving sexual offences

Issuing a subpoena

1. Any party (prosecution or defence) intending to issue a subpoena in a proceeding:

  • that relates wholly or partly to a sexual offence;
  • where the proceeding commenced after 1 December 2006, or before that date where the hearing had not commenced or no evidence had been given prior to 1 December 2006;
  • where the intended subpoena will include, or potentially include, material which constitutes a confidential communication as defined in s32B(1) of the Evidence Act 1958 (the Act);

must ensure that Division 2A of the Act is complied with.

2. In addition, parties must comply with this practice direction.

Compelling production or producing protected evidence – notice to be given

3. A party seeking to compel production of protected evidence or produce protected evidence as defined in s32B(1) of the Act must give notice in accordance with s32C(2) of the Act.

4. The notice must also be provided to the judge in charge of the Sex Offences List through the administrative coordinator of that list, or to the trial judge where allocated, through the associate.

5. The notice must contain a description of the material sought to be compelled to be produced or produced and a brief statement as to the matters relied on to satisfy the requirements of s32D of the Act.

6. On receiving a notice in accordance with para 3, the informant must, within a reasonable time, give a copy of the notice to the protected confider as defined under the Act.

7. Where the proceeding will include a special hearing pursuant to s41G of the Act, the party seeking to compel production or produce must, in consultation with the administrative coordinator of the Sex Offences List, have the matter listed for mention as soon as the party becomes aware that an application pursuant to s32C of the Act will be made. At that mention parties must be in a position to address matters relevant to refining the nature and number of documents sought and the making of a s32C(6) direction where appropriate.

8. In all other cases, the party seeking to compel production or produce must, in consultation with the administrative coordinator of the Sex Offences List or the associate to the trial judge where allocated, have the matter listed for the hearing of the application, having regard to the notice requirements contained in para 3. At the hearing of the application, parties must be in a position to address matters relevant to refining the nature and number of documents sought and the making of a s32C(6) direction where appropriate.

Leave to inspect

9. Where leave is granted to compel production or produce, and on issue of the subpoena, a party who seeks leave to inspect the documents must, in consultation with the administrative coordinator of the Sex Offences List or the associate to the trial judge where allocated, have the matter listed for the hearing of the application to inspect.

Adducing protected evidence

10. Where a party seeks leave to adduce protected evidence, that party must give notice in accordance with s32C(2) of the Act.

11. The notice must also be provided to the judge in charge of the Sex Offences List through the administrative coordinator of that list, or the trial judge where allocated, through the associate.

12. On receiving a notice in accordance with para 10, the informant must, within a reasonable time, give a copy of the notice to the protected confider.

13. The party seeking to adduce protected evidence must, in consultation with the administrative coordinator of the Sex Offences List or the associate to the trial judge where allocated, have the matter listed for the hearing of the application, having regard to the notice requirements contained in para 10.

Judge Sexton
Judge in charge, Sex Offences List
23 May 2008

Children’s Court

Cite as: (2008) 82(7) LIJ, p. 74

Applications by apprehension
Practice Note No 1 of 2008

This practice note is issued pursuant to s592 of the Children, Youth and Families Act 2005.

From 2 June 2008 the Family Division registry of the Melbourne Children’s Court will not accept the filing of any application by apprehension after 2pm on any sitting day.

This change from the previous time of 3pm is required because of the unprecedented growth in workload experienced by the Court. Applications by apprehension have increased at the rate of 20 per cent per annum for each of the past five years. The Court has regularly been sitting into the evening to determine submissions contests that arise from the increased number of applications by apprehension. Such work practices are unsustainable.

Judge Paul Grant
President, Children’s Court
29 May 2008

Victims of Crime
Assistance Tribunal

Cite as: (2008) 82(7) LIJ, p. 74

Awards for counselling expenses
Practice Direction No 1 of 2008

Practice direction issued pursuant to s58 of the Victims of Crime Assistance Act 1996.

Background
The Victims of Crime Assistance Tribunal (Tribunal) may award financial assistance to an eligible applicant for expenses actually incurred, or reasonably likely to be incurred, for reasonable counselling: ss8, 10 and 13 Victims of Crime Assistance Act 1996.

Purpose

The purpose of this practice direction is to prescribe procedures to assist the Tribunal to determine an application for an award for counselling expenses, and in particular to assess:

  • the qualifications of the proposed counsellor to diagnose and/or treat the applicant;
  • the appropriateness and efficacy of the proposed treatment to assist the applicant to recover from the act of violence which has led to them making an application to the Tribunal;
  • whether the proposed cost of the treatment is “reasonable”;
  • the progress of treatment provided to an applicant when further treatment is recommended;

and to ensure that the applicant has been informed by the counsellor of the proposed treatment and endorses it.

This practice direction applies to reports filed by counsellors providing treatment, and is not applicable to assessment reports (i.e. reports where the report writer is not proposing to provide counselling to the applicant). Reference should be made to Practice Direction No 2 of 2008 for direction regarding assessment reports by non-treating psychologists and psychiatrists.

Awards for counselling expenses
An award for a counselling expense is made to the applicant. The award authorises the applicant to incur counselling expenses with a particular counsellor consistent with the treatment plan proposed by that counsellor.

When an award for counselling expense is made, the report is the basis for measuring the effectiveness of the treatment provided, and will be relevant in the assessment of any future application for an award for further counselling expenses.

For adult applicants accessing counselling for the first time with respect to an act of violence, the Tribunal will usually pay for the first five hours of counselling for the provision of “information, comfort, emotional and instrumental support (psychological first aid)”1 by an appropriately qualified counsellor. All expenses awarded are at the discretion of the Tribunal.

Applicants who have already accessed an initial five hours of counselling through the Victims Assistance and Counselling Program, Transport Accident Commission (TAC), WorkCover or the Medicare Better Access to Psychiatrists, Psychologists and General Practitioners Benefits Scheme and who want additional counselling will be required to make an application for an award for additional counselling expenses to be paid by the Tribunal (see Form 2).*

All applicants seeking an award for counselling expenses are required to complete the Application for Counselling form (see Form 4).*

The Tribunal will consider funding the cost of reasonable counselling services that are additional to the first five hours of counselling accessed by an applicant where:

  • there is proper clinical justification;
  • the counselling is likely to be effective in achieving and maintaining the applicant’s recovery;
  • the proposed treatment method is considered by the professional associations/bodies to which the counsellor belongs to be an appropriate method; and
  • a treatment plan has been considered and approved by the Tribunal.

The Tribunal is unlikely to pay counselling expenses incurred without prior approval of the Tribunal, except for the provision of “psychological first aid” (i.e. the first five hours of counselling).

Australian Centre for Posttraumatic Mental Health, Australian Guidelines for the Treatment of Adults with Acute Stress Disorder and Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (ACPMH Guidelines)

The Tribunal may refer to the ACPMH Guidelines to assist in making decisions about the assessment and treatment of Acute Stress Disorder (ASD) and Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD). The ACPMH Guidelines acknowledge that ASD and PTSD are only some of the conditions faced by individuals affected by traumatic events.
The ACPMH Guidelines will not be applicable to all applicants.

Treating counsellor reports
A counsellor must prepare one of the following reports in support of an application for an award for counselling expenses:

Initial Report – Recommendation for up to five hours of counselling (see Form 1)*
This report is required when a counsellor has provided up to five hours of counselling, and the applicant does not seek an award for further counselling.

Initial Report – Recommendation for more than five hours of counselling (See Form 2)*
This report is required where the applicant seeks an award for more than five hours of counselling.

Subsequent Report – Recommendation for additional hours of counselling (See Form 3)*
This report is required when an applicant requests further counselling beyond that previously awarded by the Tribunal (i.e. after an initial application for counselling expenses has already been approved).

All reports must be accompanied by:

  • an Application for Counselling form (see Form 4)* signed by the applicant; and
  • if a fee is claimed for the report, a completed Counselling and Report Fee Invoice (see Form 5)* for that report; and
  • if a fee is claimed for the counselling sessions already provided, a completed Counselling and Report Fee Invoice for that counselling (may be included on invoice for report) (see Form 5).*

Non-attendance of applicant at scheduled session
If a counsellor intends to file an invoice with the Tribunal claiming a fee for a scheduled counselling session that an applicant failed to attend, the counsellor is required to write to the Tribunal within seven days of the scheduled session to advise of the following:

  • date and time of scheduled session;
  • date and time of notice (if any) received from the applicant regarding their non-attendance at the scheduled session; and
  • the counsellor’s published cancellation policy.

The letter from the counsellor must be accompanied by a Counselling and Report Fee Invoice (see Form 5)* for the scheduled session, with an endorsement made on the invoice that the applicant did not attend the session as scheduled.

Travel expenses
The financial assistance awarded for counselling services (reports and counselling sessions) will not include assistance for travel expenses of the applicant and/or counsellor for attendance at a counselling session. Where an applicant seeks financial assistance for travel expenses to attend counselling, a specific request for that assistance must be made.

Change of counselling practitioner
In the event that an applicant ceases treatment with the author of the approved treatment plan and approaches another counsellor for counselling, the proposed counsellor must write to the Tribunal to advise that they agree to provide counselling services consistent with the approved treatment plan, or to propose a new treatment plan. The Tribunal will then consider authorising that the previously awarded counselling be provided by the new counsellor.

The Tribunal is unlikely to pay any unauthorised counselling expenses incurred by the applicant with a counsellor with whom the Tribunal has not authorised the applicant to incur expenses.

Commencement

This practice direction has effect from 1 July 2008.

Practice Direction No 9 of 2003 will continue to apply to all applications for counselling, reports and invoices received by the Tribunal prior to 1 July 2008.

* Due to space constraints these forms have not been reproduced here. The full versions of VOCAT practice directions (including the forms) can be found at http://www.vocat.vic.gov.au under “Practice Directions and Guidelines”.

1. Australian Centre for Posttraumatic Mental Health, Australian Guidelines for the Treatment of Adults with Acute Stress Disorder and Posttraumatic Stress Disorder, 2007, Melbourne.

Chief Magistrate Ian L Gray
8 May 2008

Victims of Crime
Assistance Tribunal

Cite as: (2008) 82(7) LIJ, p. 76

Psychological/psychiatric assessment reports by non-treating practitioners
Practice Direction No 2 of 2008
Practice direction issued pursuant to s58 of the Victims Of Crime Assistance Act 1996.

Background
An applicant, the applicant’s solicitor or the Tribunal may request that a psychologist or psychiatrist prepare an assessment report regarding an applicant’s psychological/psychiatric condition and treatment/counselling needs.

Purpose
The purpose of this practice direction is to prescribe procedures in relation to the preparation and filing of assessment reports prepared by psychologists or psychiatrists who will not be providing treatment/counselling to the applicant the subject of the report.

Reports by psychologists and psychiatrists proposing to provide treatment or counselling to the applicant, and reports in support of the payment of counselling expenses, are to be filed in accordance with Practice Direction No 1 of 2008.

Assessment reports filed by applicant
An applicant or their legal representative may, on their own initiative, file a psychological or psychiatric assessment report prepared by a suitably qualified practitioner in circumstances where the practitioner preparing the report does not propose to provide counselling to the applicant. All expenses awarded are at the discretion of the Tribunal.

Assessment reports requested by Tribunal
Pursuant to s39(1)(b) of the Victims of Crime Assistance Act 1996 (the Act), the Tribunal may, if it determines that it requires further information to enable it to determine an application, order the preparation and submission to the Tribunal of an assessment report. Pursuant to s39(5) of the Act, the Tribunal must bear the costs of, and incidental to, the preparation of an assessment report.

To facilitate the preparation and submission of an assessment report, the Tribunal may refer an applicant to a particular psychologist or psychiatrist. A panel of psychologists and psychiatrists has been appointed to provide independent psychological and psychiatric assessments at the request of the Tribunal.

Form of assessment report
A psychologist or psychiatrist who assesses and reports to the Tribunal as to the psychological/psychiatric condition of and treatment/counselling needs of an applicant shall prepare their report in the format set out in Form 1 (Psychological/Psychiatric Assessment Report).*

A completed Counselling and Report Fee Invoice for the expense associated with the assessment report must accompany the report (see Form 5 attached to Practice Direction No 1 of 2008).*

Commencement
This practice direction has effect from 1 July 2008.

Practice Direction No 9 of 2003 will continue to apply to all assessment reports and invoices received by the Tribunal prior to 1 July 2008.

Chief Magistrate Ian L Gray
8 May 2008

* Due to space constraints these forms have not been reproduced here. The full versions of VOCAT practice directions (including the forms) can be found at http://www.vocat.vic.gov.au under “Practice Directions and Guidelines”.

Comments




Leave message



 
 Security code
 
LIV Social
Footer